RS Zip Zap Mini RC RF Servo Tutorial

crimson

Jr Hunter
Great i managed to pull one apart and test it,

My concern now is that what is there to stop the RF finder as it comes down, my servo has a range of 180 but this only needs to go 90

Is there a way to build in a safe guard to stop the servo once the stalk is lowered ?

Its hard to tell when your wearing the mask
Any development on this ?
 
I tried to follow this post exactly, with the exception that I used a 9g micro servo instead of the low profile. It seemed to work until the receiver board started smoking near the solder joints of the wires that go to the servo.
Should I go with the hitec servo to avoid this?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Farra

New Hunter
Does the direction or rotation type matter for the servo motor? Also, can the servo motor go both clockwise and counterclockwise? the video it obviously can but the direction options seem to suggest that it only turn one direction. Thanks!
 

Vincena74

New Hunter
Grateful to the original poster of this thread, but after attempting it recenty with no luck, figured I would share my experience. Since the Zip Zap is no longer made, I purchased the Mini RC they currently sell that is packed as though it is in soda can. The boards were different than the tutorial, but we felt confident we could figure it out. We meaning myself and Hubby. We are constantly messing with our costumes electronics... his being ANH Vader and mine SE Boba. I should also add he is a licensed electrician by day... lol.

So the newer version did not translate and I went to eBay to seek out an original Zip Zap. When it arrived, we thought we'd play with it before demolishing it... this kid in us right!?! Yeah no joy. First thought was with its age the built-in rechargeable car battery was toast, and proceeded to deconstruct and assemble following the thread instructions... again no joy! Was it so old that even the solid state was toast?

Today Hubby comes home with an RC he picked up at Wal-Mart for $9.95... what the heck, let's throw MORE money at Boba. Long story short, the boards are slightly bigger, but it works!!! So here is how we did it.

Here is the car we purchased. Yeah it was out of the box before I realized this was something everyone could benefit from.
post-7271-0-44738500-1487041624_thumb.jpg


Here are the two components before removing them. The remote board is held in by a screw and two solder points. The remote was held by two screws and two solder points.
Car parts.jpg


Here are the two boards with their respective power wires connected, and the servo leads. The board on the bottom left is the remote board which will go in your gauntlet, and the one still in the cradle goes in your helmet. Prior to disconnecting the car and attaching the servo, we turned everything on and made sure the car wheels were getting a signal from the control board. Then we used a JST connector (red rectangle) on the helmet board which will be connected to the servo. This will allow an easy swap out in the event the servo goes bad at a later date. I would say you can pick one up at your local Radio Shack but 'ehh, not anymore for some of us.
post-7271-0-10482000-1487042160_thumb.jpg


This shows the helmet board with the servo connected. (There are steps inside the servo that need to be done that are earlier in this tutorial thread). You can see we are powering this board using 4-AAA's. It is ultimately my goal to find a rechargable system, but this will work for now.
post-7271-0-60736100-1487042452_thumb.jpg


In order to decrease the thickness of the board for the helmet, we needed to remove the elevated on/off switch as shown here.
post-7271-0-36053000-1487042546_thumb.jpg


Take a pair of tin snip and cut the assembly so that you have tabs to pull with a pair of pliers. You will heat the attachment points on the board and pull the remaining posts out. At this point, you will need to bridge the three solder points together to permanently bridge the circuit.
post-7271-0-96987100-1487042685_thumb.jpg


Next we removed the fwd and back pushbuttons from the control board to connect the switches from my gauntlet. Some folks I've seen use the momentary buttons on the right gauntlet, but since I am right handed and the left side has a bit more room, I opted for a left gaunt mount instead. The switches did not want to bond to the solder, so we removed them... very carefully. You don't want to melt the board. The switches are surface-mounted, so you'll want to add solder to the board before attempting to attach the wires. We checked our solder points one switch first before doing the second. Here is the completed control board. After this photo was taken, I went back and hot glued all my wire connection points. This board is powered with 2-AAA's.
post-7271-0-82154900-1487043238_thumb.jpg


This completes the car board mods. You'll need to go back and add the mods for the servo which are given in the beginning thread, as well as the specifics on the servo itself. Then we will be doing a similar method to mount this rig in the helmet. I may show that as well. It's certainly not pretty, with a nice case for all the boards, but if you are on a budget and handy with soldering, you can do this project for less than $100.00




Servo.jpg


Car parts.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

sproigo

New Hunter
Grateful to the original poster of this thread, but after attempting it recenty with no luck, figured I would share my experience. Since the Zip Zap is no longer made, I purchased the Mini RC they currently sell that is packed as though it is in soda can. The boards were different than the tutorial, but we felt confident we could figure it out. We meaning myself and Hubby. We are constantly messing with our costumes electronics... his being ANH Vader and mine SE Boba. I should also add he is a licensed electrician by day... lol.

So the newer version did not translate and I went to eBay to seek out an original Zip Zap. When it arrived, we thought we'd play with it before demolishing it... this kid in us right!?! Yeah no joy. First thought was with its age the built-in rechargeable car battery was toast, and proceeded to deconstruct and assemble following the thread instructions... again no joy! Was it so old that even the solid state was toast?

Today Hubby comes home with an RC he picked up at Wal-Mart for $9.95... what the heck, let's throw MORE money at Boba. Long story short, the boards are slightly bigger, but it works!!! So here is how we did it.

Here is the car we purchased. Yeah it was out of the box before I realized this was something everyone could benefit from.
post-7271-0-44738500-1487041624_thumb.jpg


Here are the two components before removing them. The remote board is held in by a screw and two solder points. The remote was held by two screws and two solder points.
View attachment 107204


Here are the two boards with their respective power wires connected, and the servo leads. The board on the bottom left is the remote board which will go in your gauntlet, and the one still in the cradle goes in your helmet. Prior to disconnecting the car and attaching the servo, we turned everything on and made sure the car wheels were getting a signal from the control board. Then we used a JST connector (red rectangle) on the helmet board which will be connected to the servo. This will allow an easy swap out in the event the servo goes bad at a later date. I would say you can pick one up at your local Radio Shack but 'ehh, not anymore for some of us.
post-7271-0-10482000-1487042160_thumb.jpg


This shows the helmet board with the servo connected. (There are steps inside the servo that need to be done that are earlier in this tutorial thread). You can see we are powering this board using 4-AAA's. It is ultimately my goal to find a rechargable system, but this will work for now.
post-7271-0-60736100-1487042452_thumb.jpg


In order to decrease the thickness of the board for the helmet, we needed to remove the elevated on/off switch as shown here.
post-7271-0-36053000-1487042546_thumb.jpg


Take a pair of tin snip and cut the assembly so that you have tabs to pull with a pair of pliers. You will heat the attachment points on the board and pull the remaining posts out. At this point, you will need to bridge the three solder points together to permanently bridge the circuit.
post-7271-0-96987100-1487042685_thumb.jpg


Next we removed the fwd and back pushbuttons from the control board to connect the switches from my gauntlet. Some folks I've seen use the momentary buttons on the right gauntlet, but since I am right handed and the left side has a bit more room, I opted for a left gaunt mount instead. The switches did not want to bond to the solder, so we removed them... very carefully. You don't want to melt the board. The switches are surface-mounted, so you'll want to add solder to the board before attempting to attach the wires. We checked our solder points one switch first before doing the second. Here is the completed control board. After this photo was taken, I went back and hot glued all my wire connection points. This board is powered with 2-AAA's.
post-7271-0-82154900-1487043238_thumb.jpg


This completes the car board mods. You'll need to go back and add the mods for the servo which are given in the beginning thread, as well as the specifics on the servo itself. Then we will be doing a similar method to mount this rig in the helmet. I may show that as well. It's certainly not pretty, with a nice case for all the boards, but if you are on a budget and handy with soldering, you can do this project for less than $100.00
THAT is all great to know, I'm in the process of attempting the rc servo mod and illuminating LED's atop the RF stock... so I'm glad to know the walmart suckers work just as well!
Thanks!
 
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Vincena74

New Hunter
Yep!! I have trooped it three times now, and we initially decided to power the helmet board with only 3-AAA's. The first troop found the batteries drained very quickly, so we bumped it back to 4 and it works great.
 

hamsandwich72

Jr Hunter
Awesome thread/idea.

Like others before me, my ZipZap had slightly different colors on the wiring for the receiver portion. I used the blue and yellow wires to connect to the servo and everything worked fine.
 

Lynn TXP 0369

Well-Known Hunter
I'm going a different route and I'm surprised no has thought of it. I'm going to use this same radio that I use for my all of my RC cars. Tower Hobbies 224 2-Channel System
If it works like I think it will, just add a battery pack to power the receiver, plug in servo to receiver and the helmet is done.

Field strip radio of electronics and install said electronics in gauntlet or blaster and figure out how to have a on off switch mounted to the steering switch on the radio circuit. I see no reason why this won't work. The only mod needed is to how you make an up down switch for the steering circuit.

I guess you could add a knob in place of the steering wheel and incorporate that some how into the gauntlet someplace. I just gotta charge up a spare receiver battery pack and see if the servo will power off of it, if it does, I'm golden. $44 for my RC gear not including a $24 servo.
Lynn
 

hvacdon

Hunter
Lynn, pasted below is what I plan on using. The buttons or momentary contact. So, you can use one channel for the down of the RF and the other for the up position. I know we're not supposed to post links to ebay, so here's the description and pic of what it looks like below. This should be an easy modification to connect to the contacts in the remote and hard wire to switches in the gauntlet. You will need a battery pack for your relays on the board and the stalk actuator.
Don




Details about 12V 10A 2 Channel Remote Control Switch Relay Wireless Transmitter+Receiver
s-l500.jpg
 
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