Routing sintra - possible?


Jedibrain

Hunter
I've been searching and reading madly about working with sintra - which is what I plan to make my armor out of. I haven't seen specifically any info about cutting it with a router.

Can the stuff be straight cut? Beveled? Rounded over? using a router? If so, does anyone have any experince with what cutting speeds work best?

Thanks for the info.

Regards,
Brian
 

Jluck

Active Hunter
id say dremmel' it or a roto-zip may be easier, especially control in those spaces where u want good contour.. idk, i would think the plastic might not respond cut wise so well with a router as it does with a rotary tool... and a medium to medium/slower speed so they dont get away from ya so easy :cheers
 

Jedibrain

Hunter
I see. Well my router's tops speed is only 23,000 rpm, so I wasn't thinking there would be any more a problem with friction/smoking vs, a dremel. I don't know what the low end speed is. I suppose the cutting surface is a bit more with the router. Maybe I'll take a piece outside (once I get some!) and give it a shot.

My goal would be to have a nice rounded edge to the top of the armor, which I'm not sure I have the control to achieve with a dremel.

-Brian
 

GCNgamer128

Sr Hunter
The toxic fumes of sintra can be pretty poisonous if you are around them for a long while, I also don't know how sintra would react to a router. If I were you, I'd try routing the sintra in a well ventalated area with a piece of scrap Sintra. This way you will know if it will melt, burn, crack, or anything else unfortunate. An exacto blade works pretty well with cutting Sintra, but it does dull the blade quickly.
 

drcrash

Hunter
Routing Sintra is easy at LOW speeds. It routs like wood, and machines easily and well.

High speeds will melt it. In general, you want LOW speeds and big bits for plastic, so that you don't generate a lot of friction and end up with a melted mess (and more toxic fumes).

Plastics manufacturers generally have data sheets online that give instructions for machining, thermoforming, and gluing each plastic, with specific recommendations for bits, bit speed and feed speed, adhesives, thermoforming temperatures, etc.

Here's a good document with all that stuff about doing stuff with Sintra, which is a very fun material:

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&ct=r...IKqc8-L3umIaZiLeg&sig2=kh2SKBB5RCAloQBf7eJdRg
 

tbone9600

Active Hunter
I would look into the router attachment for the dremel. that way you could maybe control the speed a little better and it isn't quite so bulky.
 

Pesh

Active Hunter
Sintra fumes aren't toxic! They just send you to a wonderful place, which you can't quite recall when you eventually wake up; slumped on your workbench with your ears bleeding.
Ah memories.... where'd they go?
 

Jedibrain

Hunter
I've used my jig saw, which is bascially a hand held scroll saw, as well as a friends band saw. Both work very well. I haven't actually tried routing yet, though I might tomorrow.

-Brian
 

GrottyFurball

Active Hunter
Sintra fumes aren't toxic! They just send you to a wonderful place, which you can't quite recall when you eventually wake up; slumped on your workbench with your ears bleeding.
Ah memories.... where'd they go?


:lol: YEEEEAAAAH, way to try and trick him. In actuality it makes you feel like you're comming down with a cold.

As for routering it. there really isn't much of a bead on the edge of the armor and it's replicated easy enough with sand paper. It's possible to router it but keep in mind "sintra" is a brand name and different brands have different quality, some sintra is more brittle than others.
 
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