Shin Tools Newbie- my first Fett project- Shin Tools

thd9791

New Hunter
hey everyone.

Tom here, I’ve been on the RPF for a long time and I stumbled into Fett territory recently. Not with a Webley (someday) but with an old Paterson squeegee!

I know they’re still available new, but I like using old parts. I found this one and nabbed it from Germany. It’s actually Gray instead of white, and unfortunately has stress cracks at the pin joints. Bits actually fell off when I made the first cuts. It’s norhing that Apoxie Sculpt can’t fix though.

So, after learning how these springy squeegees function, I used a razor saw and metal file to remove the lower parts and the last finger grip. It’s already gray, and has a diferent brand name on it, maybe an aftermarket? Next is to rescue the broken corner and add some adhesive around the other pins for support
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thd9791

New Hunter
Getting the Apoxie Sculpt out today. I found out Jessops is a photography equipment retailer, and has been around since the 1930s whenit started i Leicester. So maybe this is just another, identical, brand of this squeegee.

Jessops - Wikipedia
 

thd9791

New Hunter
Alright, this one put up a good fight

Trimming the rubber inserts and putting this back together was no problem. I went ahead and studied some of the screen caps and exhibits where these are seen and noted this tool is definitely set cockeyed so it fit inside the pocket, check.

Now, the split pin holes... it seems a little counterproductive but I opened up the cracks with a razor saw and swabbed silicone glue in there (same stuff I dabbed under the rubber inserts before sliding them back in). The cracks were basically too small for a thick glue though so I instead used a drop of superglue. Flowed right into the cracks! This picture is of the e6000 before I tried to trim it..
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Before this, I made some choices about the inside. Of course I was going to E6000 this together, but I thought I’d add some meat in the empty spaces where the springs used to go. Here I went to my parts bins. I ended up stacking 6-8 small hex nuts in the openings, and running e6000 around the rest. I added more nuts up top where the sides are set further a part. I also did a small stack of 2-3 in the left arm spring hole.
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For the broken tip, I mixed some apoxie sculpt and applied it. This is a rough squashed shape that I’ll sand down once it cures.
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Unfortunately the superglue was a magnet for apoxie dust and dirt, and e6000 can drip everywhere so I’ll have to clean this up a bit.
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thd9791

New Hunter
Okay, so my workshop looks a bit different than most. I have no airbrush, no lathe and very limited painting space. So I took the Prop house approach, quick and dirty, easy to acquire but durable products.

So, with such small amount of orange I didn’t want to buy a whole rattle can. I instead got some matte plain Tamiya orange acrylic. Masked off the area and brushed it on. I accidentally got some brush strokes that I tried to remove with high grit sandpaper. Since it was enamel, I let it cure all the way before dusting any weathering over it.

I went with boring gray satin rustoleum. I dusted it on and got a little excited! The enamel solvents didn’t mess with the acrylic (though I hear acrylic over enamel on the other hand is a mess) I guess next comes a few spots of black
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Now, being a light gray product, sanding off the edges really didn’t make it pop. But the gray does hide the apoxie sculpt repairs, except for my hole plug
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