Modeling clay


dankenman

Hunter
:confused
Can anyone give me advice on what is a good clay for sculpting that doesnt dry out at room temp? I went to school for ceramics, but the clay I used was for drying out, and firing in a kiln. I have seen some room temp. clays out there, but was hoping to get some feedback on what brands/kinds work best. I am interested in doing some sculpts, and then possibly get into vacuum forming, or mold making. Ultimately I would like to make a custom helmet and armor set, maybe some masks, etc... I appreciate any info. I did see the thread about where to get supplies, but what is good for what I intend to do?
 

dankenman

Hunter
Wow that was quick. Thanks Squirrel. Have you used any of these clays? I was thinking Klean clay, so that is probably what I will go with. Any opinions or comments on it?
 
Klean Klay would defintely be the way to go for sculpting with the intention of moulding.
It doesn't contain sulphur so it won't react with silicone rubber moulds.
It comes in 4 stages of hardness and can be used again and again.
 

clonesix

Active Hunter
Water clay works fine for the things that you list. If you cover the sculpt with a wet towel and a plastic bag, it will remain workable for over a year. You can also vacu-form right over the wet clay. ...And it's cheap and available everywhere.




:confused
Can anyone give me advice on what is a good clay for sculpting that doesnt dry out at room temp? I went to school for ceramics, but the clay I used was for drying out, and firing in a kiln. I have seen some room temp. clays out there, but was hoping to get some feedback on what brands/kinds work best. I am interested in doing some sculpts, and then possibly get into vacuum forming, or mold making. Ultimately I would like to make a custom helmet and armor set, maybe some masks, etc... I appreciate any info. I did see the thread about where to get supplies, but what is good for what I intend to do?
 

dankenman

Hunter
Originally posted by clonesix:
Water clay works fine for the things that you list. If you cover the sculpt with a wet towel and a plastic bag, it will remain workable for over a year. You can also vacu-form right over the wet clay. ...And it's cheap and available everywhere.
I didnt realize. I have about 100 pounds of water based clay for my sculptures and pottery, so I have lots of experience with it and keeping it wet and workable for long periods. I made a 7 foot sculpture that took a few months, and it held together though the drying/firing process.(what a pain in the but getting it into the kiln!) If the clay dries uneven it splits and cracks and wont stick to other clay, so sometimes it can be a pain to keep the moisture content uniform. Also, when you sculpt with it, the forms you make must be hollow, or they will break when you dry them/fire them. (obviously with this project I will not be firing the sculpt, so a solid piece will be ok.) I may try it, but I am really interested in trying out some oil based clay, if not just to expand my knowledge and try something new. Thanks for the info.
 
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