3D printer for Boba Fett


RedeemedHunter

New Hunter
I'm looking at purchasing a 3d printer to start working on a Boba Fett build (post sarlac/repaint version), I've got at least $500 for the printer itself, and willing to go higher for the right machine but would like to avoid it reaching 900-1000ish if possible. I'd like to print with PETG. One of my biggest concerns is the backplate due to its size in regards to print volume, and whether it'd be worth factoring in a print volume capable of printing that piece in one print or printing it as separate pieces. Any advice would be appreciated.
 

Fettology

Hunter

RedeemedHunter

New Hunter
Thank you, that's one of the printers I've been looking into, just felt it'd be a good idea to hear others experience with how their printers handled this project. I'm pretty sure PETG doesn't require one, but have heard it can be tricky to get the settings right initially.
 

vaders right hand

Active Hunter
Not an expert here by any means , but I've been dipping my toes into the 3D printing world , for small parts I have a flash forge adventure 3 lite , and just ordered a creality cr10
 

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Fettology

Hunter
My only suggestion is to do hand sanding on most of your items and not coat them in epoxy like some people do. It softens all the sharp edges and can make things look too smooth in my opinion. But what you put into it is what you’ll get out of it. Printing is a great tool but still requires work after it’s printed.
 

RedeemedHunter

New Hunter
Not an expert here by any means , but I've been dipping my toes into the 3D printing world , for small parts I have a flash forge adventure 3 lite , and just ordered a creality cr10
Interesting, the parts look good and it seemed to handle the small details well from what I can tell. Im sure I'll have a ways to go once I get ahold of a printer on learning the process.


My only suggestion is to do hand sanding on most of your items and not coat them in epoxy like some people do. It softens all the sharp edges and can make things look too smooth in my opinion. But what you put into it is what you’ll get out of it. Printing is a great tool but still requires work after it’s printed.
Oh yeah no doubt, I didn't realize the end products could look so nice until my friend showed me some stuff on the processing (print, bondo/lots of sanding , optional resin/epoxy, paint etc), was used to seeing prints that were very obviously printed with all the layer lines. I'm already anticipating heavy amounts of time will be spent in the post processing stage, but I feel it must all be worth it when after it all, youre holding the results of all that work.
 

stryker181

New Hunter
I am in the process of 3D printing out the parts as well. Lots of sanding and body filler and time...lots of time. My choice of printer was the Anycubic Chiron. I am a bigger guy and need to print out parts a little bigger to look right on me. I have printed RafalFett's armour and the jetpack body at 110% and all the parts (printed separately of course) fit on the printer as one piece. With a 400x400x450 work volume it can print really big pieces but takes a long time. When I printed the jetpack body out it took three weeks on the printer.
I have a .25mm nozzle for the really small stuff like the dental files and the expander. They are good but a second resin printer for those parts would be better and have more detail.
I have upgraded some parts on the printer to make it quieter and dialled it in a bit better so I am making a second jetpack right now.

Advice:
Big prints require a big printer that requires a lot of real estate.
Expect some failed prints. Don't get frustrated.
Get a UPS to save yourself from power outages. The Chiron remembers to start where it lost power but a 230 degree nozzle left on the print leave a pretty good melt point.
PETG is a good option for strong prints that you can sand and do it inside your house. You don't need an enclosure but you need a heated print bed.
You can power sand PETG far easier then PLA (I have done it). PLA is great for details but doesn't stand up to heat during the sanding process and it melts.
Shout out to RafalFett as he has the majority of the files that you will need and you can find them on the forum. His files are awesome and accurate and has invested a lot of research and time and effort. I have taken his and a few other makers and adjusted them a little for printing. I did things like thickening the walls using Meshmixer and Fusion 360. Fortunately these programs are free.
Most importantly have fun.
 

Hump

New Hunter
I'm also new and absolutely love my Artillery Sidewinder X1. It has a 300x300x400 print volume and i did next to nothing to configure it...worked great right out of the box. Highly recommend.
 
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